Foods

Furikake Seasoning

Furikake seasoning is a delightful mix of savory, umami goodness with a hint of saltiness. It’s made with a blend of nutty seeds, spices, dried fish, and crispy seaweed- don’t knock it ’til you try it! Sprinkle this Japanese condiment over rice, noodles, veggies, or even chips or popcorn to instantly elevate their flavors and add a satisfying crunch.

Furikake seasoning is the condiment you didn’t know you needed! Try it on a sushi bake or poke bowl for a pop of extra flavor.

What is Furikake Seasoning?

Furikake seasoning is a tasty condiment that originated in Japan. If you’ve never tried it before, it’s a flavorful blend of ingredients like sesame seeds, seaweed, dried fish, and spices. This delightful seasoning is commonly used to sprinkle over rice, noodles, and vegetables to enhance their taste and add a satisfying crunch. It has become a beloved staple in Japanese and Hawaiian cuisine and is now enjoyed by people all over the world.

If you’re not familiar with it, I know that a seasoning made with seaweed and dried fish might seem unusual. But trust me on this one! The savory, umami, and slightly nutty flavor of furikake seasoning is SO good! It’s the perfect finishing touch for all of your favorite Asian dishes. Let’s make some!

Ingredients for Furikake Seasoning

Mix all these ingredients together, and voila! You have homemade furikake seasoning that will elevate your dishes with its incredible flavors and textures. Keep in mind that you may need to check out your local Asian market to find some of these ingredients! And as always, exact measurements are in the recipe card below.

Nori: These are dried seaweed sheets that add a savory and slightly briny taste to furikake. Simply crumble or cut them into small pieces.

White and Black Sesame Seeds: These tiny seeds bring a nutty and toasty flavor to the mix. Feel free to use one or both.

Granulated Sugar: A touch of sweetness balances out the savory flavors of the furikake seasoning.

Salt: Adjust to taste.

Bonito Flakes (optional): These are thin shavings of dried fish, commonly used in Japanese cuisine.

Dried Shrimp (optional): Adding dried shrimp brings a hint of umami and seafood essence to the seasoning. If you’re not a fan of shrimp, you can skip this ingredient or also substitute it with other dried seafood like scallops or anchovies.

Ichimi Togarashi (optional): This is a Japanese chili pepper spice that adds a touch of heat and a subtle kick. If you can’t find it, cayenne pepper also works.

Dried Shiso Leaves (optional): Shiso leaves have a unique herby and minty flavor. When dried and crushed, they bring a refreshing element to furikake. If you can’t find dried shiso leaves, you can omit them or experiment with other dried herbs like basil or parsley.

Wasabi Powder (optional): Wasabi powder adds a delightful zing and heat to the furikake seasoning.

Let’s Make Furikake!

It takes less than 10 minutes to make this classic Japanese seasoning. Plus, once you’ve made it, it has a long shelf life so you can use it again and again for all of your favorite Asian and Hawaiian dishes!

Toast Seeds: Add the white sesame seeds to a skillet and heat over medium-high heat for 2-3 minutes, stirring continuously, until the seeds begin to become golden brown and fragrant.

Cool: Remove the seeds from the heat and then pour onto a piece of parchment paper. Cool completely.

Small Nori Pieces: Use your hands or kitchen shears to crush or cut up the nori sheets so you achieve tiny pieces.

Combine Ingredients: Add the toasted sesame seeds, black sesame seeds, sugar, and salt plus any additional seasonings and then mix to combine.

Customize Your Seasoning

Like other homemade seasonings, this furikake recipe is great because you can tweak it to preference. Here are a few ideas to get you started:

Play With Proportions: Don’t be afraid to adjust the amounts of each ingredient to suit your taste buds. If you love sesame seeds, add a little extra. If you enjoy a kick of heat, amp up the ichimi togarashi or try using your favorite chili powder instead.

Get Creative: Feel free to add your own personal touch to the mix. Toss in dried mushrooms, or experiment with toasted nuts like almonds or cashews for extra crunch and flavor.

Ways to Use It: While furikake seasoning is often sprinkled over rice, don’t limit yourself! Sprinkle it over noodles, salads, popcorn, roasted veggies, or even use it as a yummy topping for your favorite avocado toast. It’s a great switch up from everything bagel seasoning!

How Long Will it Last?

As long as your furikake seasoning is in an airtight container and stored in a cool, dry place, it should stay good for up to 3 months.

Print

Furikake Seasoning

Furikake seasoning is a delightful mix of savory, umami goodness with a hint of saltiness. It’s made with a blend of nutty seeds, spices, dried fish, and crispy seaweed- don’t knock it ’til you try it! Sprinkle this Japanese condiment over rice, noodles, veggies, or even chips or popcorn to instantly elevate their flavors and add a satisfying crunch.
Course condiment, Seasoning
Cuisine Japanese
Keyword furikake seasoning, furikake seasoning recipe
Prep Time 8 minutes minutes
Total Time 8 minutes minutes
Servings 1 cup
Calories 379kcal
Author Alyssa Rivers

Ingredients

3 sheets of nori¼ cup white sesame seeds2 tablespoons black sesame seeds1 teaspoon granulated sugar½ teaspoon salt2 tablespoons bonito flakes optional1 tablespoon dried shrimp optional¼ teaspoon ichimi togarashi optional2 teaspoons dried shiso leaves optional½ teaspoon wasabi powder optional

Instructions

Add the white sesame seeds to a skillet and heat over medium-high heat for 2-3 minutes, stirring continuously, until the seeds begin to become golden brown and fragrant.
Remove the seeds from the heat and pour onto a piece of parchment paper. Cool completely.
Use your hands or kitchen shears to crush or cut up the nori sheets into tiny pieces.
Add the toasted sesame seeds, black sesame seeds, sugar, and salt plus any additional seasonings and mix to combine.

Nutrition

Calories: 379kcal | Carbohydrates: 17g | Protein: 22g | Fat: 27g | Saturated Fat: 4g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 12g | Monounsaturated Fat: 10g | Cholesterol: 170mg | Sodium: 1705mg | Potassium: 303mg | Fiber: 7g | Sugar: 4g | Vitamin A: 543IU | Vitamin C: 3mg | Calcium: 589mg | Iron: 9mg

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